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MTHFR Questions From Listeners.

MTHFR is such a strange journey, and it seems like no two people’s experiences are the same. I kind of backed into MTHFR by accident. I found a multivitamin that I then told all of my clients about because it was the only multivitamin that had ever worked for me, ever. Turns out, I felt such a difference because it happened to have 5-LMTHF in it, as opposed to lesser forms of folate. I didn’t know that at the time. It was a few years after that that I heard about MTHFR and discovered my own polymorphism. Others find out about MTHFR as a part of their search for symptom relief and tackle it that way.

The weirdest part about it, as we’re finding in the MTHFR community Genetic Rockstars, is that small experiences often overlap, but big overarching patterns can vary widely.

This week, we’re tidying up some unfinished business. A few of you have been kind enough to leave questions for me on the website. Let’s get to those!

Does Amy Still Take Appointments?

First, we’ve got one from Sandy. She writes, ” I would like to know if Amy sees patients. I have an interesting combination of issues, one being severe folic acid/folate/B12 intolerance. Such great information on these pages, but I wonder if she takes appointments. Thanks very much, Sandy.”

Coaches who specialize in MTHFR can offer a number of benefits to their clients
Coaches who specialize in MTHFR can offer a number of benefits to their clients

In good news, we have so many options, Sandy! First off, it sounds like you’ve got a definite challenge on your hands, which is always fun. Secondly, here are the options. There are three ways to work with me, Amy.

  1. Join the MTHFR community, Genetic Rockstars: I know a lot of people consider this to be less of a therapeutic option and more of a social one. I can honestly say, it’s much more than that. The community is a place to connect with other people who have the same challenges, talk as a group and get questions answered – including by me. The goal is for the community to be both joyful and real-life helpful.
  2. Join the MTHFR Academy: This is an in-depth group coaching circle. We are all MTHFR folks and three weeks out of four we’ll be having coaching talks about specific topics and/or classes as a group. We also have office hours, which is group zooms with Amy to ask any and all questions, especially questions about where or when you get stuck on your MTHFR journey. As a part of this, you’ll have free access to the 10 week MTHFR 101 class and every other course, workshop, or masterclass that Amy puts out during your membership.
  3. Get one-on-one coaching: I do still see some one-on-one clients. I actually think group coaching is more effective long-term because the amount of time together and the focus on learning is so much greater, but having some one-on-one visits can be really helpful if you’re deeply stuck or have concerns that you don’t feel comfortable talking about about in a group setting. If you’re interested in this option, the first visit is always an hour and a half and you can find out more about scheduling and frequently asked questions at tohealthwiththat.com/about/ or click the Amy + Coaching link at the top of the page.

Thanks so much for your question, Sandy.

There are several benefits associated with MTHFR coaching
There are several benefits associated with MTHFR coaching

Contrast in MRIs

The second question comes from Sam. She writes, ” I am a mama of boys with the homo 677T mutation. I’m curious about contrast in MRIs when you have this mutation and also if I the mom should avoid a contrast MRI when nursing a baby with the homo 677 mutation?”

This is a great question and not one that is easy to answer. First, there are a number of contrast mediums for MRIs and the selection of those depends partly on the area, organ, or body part that is being studied. There are other factors as well.

Each different contrast medium has to include a magnetic component (it is magnetic resonance imaging, after all). Often the magnetic component is some kind of metal atom. Generally, many of the heavy metals do need to be methylated in the detoxification process, so this has the potential to be more difficult for MTHFR folks.

MTHFR and MRI Contrast medium
MTHFR and MRI Contrast medium

Many MRI mediums also contain what is called a chelating agent, which is something that helps your body to enhance excretion of the substance, reduces storage in body tissues, and reduces toxicity. Some, however, do not.

To make the conversation a bit more complicated, there isn’t actually any research that I am able to find that addresses MRI contrast mediums and genetic polymorphisms of any kind.

I would say, find out everything you can about the specific contrast agent your doctor plans on using, including the pharmacokinetics and any information they have about how the substance is cleared from your body. Also, the average rate of clearance if that data is available.

In terms of having an MRI while you’re nursing, there are several factors to consider. Certainly, nursing mamas can pass toxins, especially fat-soluble toxins, down to their kiddos through breast milk. If the MRI is potentially life-saving or treatment-altering (as it could be in tumor-related MRIs) then it is probably worth the risk. If it can be delayed without major health consequences, then that would be the most prudent option.

If you do choose to have an MRI while breastfeeding, see if you can pump and store milk before the procedure enough to feed your baby for a while after the procedure and pump and dump any potentially contaminated milk during that time. Work with your doctor to find the most critical period of time after the procedure in which excretion via breast milk is most likely.

Thanks for the great questions, and if anyone who is listening right now happens to have a question, go to tohealthwiththat.com and about half-way down the page you’ll see me asking for your questions in a video – you can ask your questions there in video, audio, or written form.

Can MTHFR gene mutation lead to carnitine deficiency?

Yes, MTHFR gene mutation can lead to carnitine deficiency. MTHFR mutations can cause a decrease in the production of L-methylfolate, which is essential for the production of carnitine. Carnitine deficiency can lead to a range of symptoms, including muscle weakness, fatigue, and heart problems. If you have an MTHFR mutation and are experiencing symptoms of carnitine deficiency, it is important to work with a healthcare provider to identify the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan, which may include supplements or dietary changes.

What is the relationship between MTHFR gene mutation and fibromyalgia?

There is some evidence to suggest a possible relationship between MTHFR gene mutations and fibromyalgia, a chronic pain disorder characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, and other symptoms.

MTHFR mutations can affect the body’s ability to produce enough L-methylfolate, which is important for many processes in the body, including the production of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. These neurotransmitters are involved in regulating mood, pain perception, and other functions that may be disrupted in fibromyalgia.

In addition, some studies have found a higher frequency of MTHFR mutations in people with fibromyalgia compared to the general population. However, other studies have not found a significant association between MTHFR mutations and fibromyalgia.

Overall, while there may be some association between MTHFR mutations and fibromyalgia, the evidence is not yet conclusive and further research is needed to fully understand the relationship between these factors. It is important to work with a healthcare provider to identify the underlying cause of fibromyalgia and develop an appropriate treatment plan, which may include lifestyle changes, medications, and other therapies.

Can MTHFR gene mutation increase the risk of fibromyalgia?

There is some evidence to suggest that MTHFR gene mutation may increase the risk of developing fibromyalgia, a chronic pain disorder characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, and other symptoms.

MTHFR mutations can affect the body’s ability to produce enough L-methylfolate, which is important for many processes in the body, including the production of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. These neurotransmitters are involved in regulating mood, pain perception, and other functions that may be disrupted in fibromyalgia.

In addition, some studies have found a higher frequency of MTHFR mutations in people with fibromyalgia compared to the general population. However, other studies have not found a significant association between MTHFR mutations and fibromyalgia.

Overall, while there may be some association between MTHFR mutations and fibromyalgia, the evidence is not yet conclusive and further research is needed to fully understand the relationship between these factors. It is important to work with a healthcare provider to identify the underlying cause of fibromyalgia and develop an appropriate treatment plan, which may include lifestyle changes, medications, and other therapies.

How does MTHFR gene mutation affect the body’s ability to produce cysteine?

MTHFR gene mutation can affect the body’s ability to produce cysteine, which is an important amino acid involved in many processes in the body.

MTHFR mutations can lead to a decrease in the production of L-methylfolate, which is required for the conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Methionine is a precursor to cysteine, so a decrease in methionine production can lead to decreased cysteine levels in the body.

Cysteine is important for the production of glutathione, which is an antioxidant that protects cells from oxidative damage. A decrease in cysteine levels may therefore lead to a decrease in glutathione production, which may contribute to a range of health problems, including inflammation, oxidative stress, and increased risk of chronic diseases. Overall, MTHFR gene mutation can affect the body’s ability to produce cysteine, which may have important implications for overall health and wellbeing. It is important to work with a healthcare provider to identify any potential nutrient deficiencies and develop an appropriate treatment plan, which may include dietary changes or supplements.

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MTHFR is a common genetic mutation that can contribute to anxiety, depression, fatigue, chronic pain, infertility, and more serious conditions like breast implant illness, heart attack, stroke, chronic fatigue syndrome, and some types of cancer. If you know or suspect you have an MTHFR variant, schedule a free 15-minute meet-and-greet appointment with MTHFR expert Dr. Amy today.

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Amy Neuzil
Amy Neuzil

Dr. Amy Neuzil, N.D. is a leading expert in MTHFR and epigenetics, and she is passionate about helping people achieve optimal health and wellness for their genetic picture. She has helped thousands of people overcome health challenges using a simple, step-by-step approach that starts with where they are today. Dr. Neuzil's unique approach to wellness has helped countless people improve their energy levels, lose weight, and feel better mentally and emotionally. If you're looking for a way to feel your best, Dr. Amy Neuzil can help. Contact her today to learn more about how she can help you achieve optimal health and wellness.

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